Friday, July 25, 2014

What Do We Know About Shakespeare?

A flash essay by Charles Bane Jr.

I once sat beside a dinner guest, an attorney, who, hearing that I was a poet, spent the evening explaining carefully why Shakespeare was a lawyer, who happened to write plays and sonnets.

This is a tribute to Shakespeare, who inhabited every soul's shoes, but it also underlines the profound difference between our times and the Bard's, when everyone had a general knowledge of law — for their safety's sake — and it further adds to our understanding that Shakespeare — very unlike most his fellow actors — and unlike poets even today, was a businessman determined to prosper, even while giving reign to his genius.

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

The Reflecting Pond


Ten years ago
I tattooed a symbolic charm
of happiness on my ankle;
now its detail
nestles within skin’s movement

This morning I turned the music up
and started screening my calls; precise
unbearable voices couldn’t reach me

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

One Night in the Garden District


I slept in your bed last night.
Searched for coffee
and an accompanying mug
in your kitchen this morning.

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

The Canadian Home


No noise, no traffic, no sirens
Only the crackling of the fires.

The solar lights brighten up the yard
Living up here is not that hard

Our furry kids run wild and free
The trees have grown two feet or three

Northern lights occasionally come
The speckled fawns will follow their mom

Friday, June 27, 2014

Quaint Sayings of Uncle Jeff: On Friends



A child of the heartland, Iva Beatrice Core (1903-1987) grew up and lived most of her life in Richland Center, Wisconsin. As a young woman of 26 in 1929, Iva was determined to collect and write down the quaint sayings of her Uncle Jeff for posterity's sake.

Uncle Jeff had this to say about friends...

Saturday, June 21, 2014

On the Road: Route 66 and a Navajo Blessing

Route 66 in Gallup, New Mexico.
The first day of summer June 21 is set aside to remember Native Americans. In Canada, National Aboriginal Day "celebrates the unique heritage, diverse cultures and outstanding achievements of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples in Canada."

On the first day of summer as Americans make plans to hit the road for summer vacations the Bar None Group found this Navajo poem that welcomes travelers to Gallup, New Mexico alongside historic Route 66.

Friday, June 20, 2014

On the Road: Selma, Alabama and the Poetry of Soul

After twice being turned back at Edmund Pettus Bridge. The March to Freedom from Selma began on March 21, 1965.

Next year marks the 50th Anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery Voting Rights March from Selma, Alabama to the state capitol 54 miles away in Montgomery. The march, from March 21-25, 1965 was a cold, wet affair that months later resulted in the Voting Rights Act being passed "the most successful civil rights law in the nation's history.".

The Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail today is marked with historical markers along U.S. Highway 80 and the Lowndes County Interpretive Center one mile from Tent City that recalls the March and the struggles of African Americans in the deep south of the mid 1960s. At the Interpretive Center we purchased two books of poetry.

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Enigmatic Beauty


I have seen you
Disappearing into the shadows,
A mere glimmer in the periphery
Of my vision,
Brief glimpses,
Often caught
In moments of inattention,
Your faint traces
Alluding to a beauty
So unfathomable
It may be fatal to behold.