Friday, March 17, 2017

Irish Poet Katharine Tynan and The Wind that Shakes the Barley


There's music in my heart all day,
I hear it late and early,
It comes from fields are far away,
The wind that shakes the barley.

Above the uplands drenched with dew
The sky hangs soft and pearly,
An emerald world is listening to
The wind that shakes the barley.

Above the bluest mountain crest
The lark is singing rarely,
It rocks the singer into rest,
The wind that shakes the barley.

Oh, still through summers and through springs
It calls me late and early.
Come home, come home, come home, it sings,
The wind that shakes the barley.


— Katharine Tynan


A native of Dublin, Ireland, Katharine Tynan (1859-1931) became life-long friends with W.B. Yeats whom she first met in 1886. A prolific writer and poet Tynan was said to be able to write one novel per month and her oeuvre includes more than 105 novels. Poetically, her output included 16 collections and two anthologies. A champion of women's rights she challenged society to accept women as authors.