Friday, April 1, 2016

The Rainy Day of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

What is it about April Showers?

The day is cold, and dark, and dreary;
It rains, and the wind is never weary;
The vine still clings to the mouldering wall,
But at every gust the dead leaves fall,
And the day is dark and dreary.

My life is cold, and dark, and dreary;
It rains, and the wind is never weary;
My thoughts still cling to the mouldering Past,
But the hopes of youth fall thick in the blast,
And the days are dark and dreary.

Be still, sad heart! and cease repining;
Behind the clouds is the sun still shining;
Thy fate is the common fate of all,
Into each life some rain must fall,
Some days must be dark and dreary.


— Henry Wadsworth Longfellow


One of America's first great poets, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807–1882) also produced the first American translation of Dante's Divine Comedy. Longfellow was inducted into the American Poets' Corner in 1993 with Stephen Crane and is immortalized on Library Way in New York City.

He wrote classic American poems; The Song of Hiawatha, Evangeline and most famously, Paul Revere’s Ride. In 1874, his poem, The Hanging of the Crane, was sold to the New York Ledger for $3000. At the time it was the highest price ever paid for a poem. The Rainy Day was first published in 1842 in Ballads and Other Poems.