Monday, March 24, 2014

On the Road in Texas: Legend of the Bluebonnet


The Texas fields are covered
With a blanket of deep blue.
But for one Native American girl,
This would not be true.

Texas land was buried and dry.
Rains just would not come.
The local tribe danced and prayed for rain,
And beat upon their drums.

The Chief made a proclamation.
He appealed to one and all.
A prized possession must be sacrificed
Before the rains would fall.

The camp fell silent,
While each person searched his heart.
But when it came to sacrifice,
With possessions they would not part.

Suddenly a little girl stepped forth,
Holding her blue-clad doll.
She placed it in the roaring fire
and raindrops then began to fall.

The rain brought forth the grass,
Among its blades, flowers of blue.
To be a sign for all the time
Of a love so pure and true.


While the author of this poem is unknown, Texas botanist Mary Daggett Lake once wrote of the Texas state flower, “Bluebonnets have inspired the poet’s pen, the artist’s brush, the cowboy’s dream, and the legislator’s eloquence throughout the broad spaces of Texas. Their royal beauty and enchanting fragrance have a particular message which speaks to the emotions with compelling directness.”